TSW Symptoms on Face and Hands

July 1, 2024

Back
Featured image for “TSW Symptoms on Face and Hands”

Topical corticosteroids are a mainstay treatment for various inflammatory skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. While these medications are generally safe and effective when used as directed, some people may develop a rare but serious adverse reaction called topical steroid withdrawal (TSW) when they stop using the creams or ointments.

TSW, also known as “red skin syndrome” or “steroid addiction,” can cause a severe rebound of skin inflammation and discomfort, often worse than the original condition being treated. The face and hands are two of the most commonly affected areas, as they are frequently exposed to topical steroids and have thinner, more sensitive skin.

In this article, we’ll take an in-depth look at the symptoms of TSW on the face and hands, including facial rednessburningstingingperioral dermatitissteroid rosaceaeyelid dermatitishand eczema flares, and crackeditchy hands. We’ll also discuss the stages of TSW, treatment options like moisturizers and emollients, and the emotional impact of this challenging condition.

Whether you’re currently using topical steroids, experiencing symptoms of TSW, or simply want to learn more about this under-recognized condition, this article will provide the information and guidance you need to take control of your skin health. Let’s dive in.

Facial TSW Symptoms

The face is one of the most common sites affected by TSW, with up to 97% of cases involving facial skin[1]. This is likely due to the frequent use of topical steroids on the face for conditions like eczema, psoriasis, and seborrheic dermatitis, as well as the thinner and more permeable nature of facial skin.

Common symptoms of facial TSW include:

  • Redness and flushing: One of the hallmark signs of TSW on the face is intense redness or flushing, often in a symmetrical pattern across the cheeks, forehead, and chin. This redness may be persistent or come and go in flares, and may be accompanied by a feeling of warmth or burning.
  • Burning and stinging: Many people with facial TSW report a burning or stinging sensation, especially when the skin is exposed to heat, sweat, or certain skincare products. This can be incredibly uncomfortable and may interfere with daily activities and sleep.
  • Itching: Intense itching is another common symptom of facial TSW, often described as a deep, unrelenting itch that is difficult to control. Scratching can lead to further skin damage and increase the risk of infection.
  • Swelling and edema: TSW can cause the face to appear swollen or puffy, particularly around the eyes, cheeks, and lips. This swelling, known as edema, is due to increased inflammation and fluid retention in the skin.
  • Dryness and flaking: As the skin barrier is disrupted in TSW, the face may become extremely dry, tight, and prone to flaking or peeling. This can be especially noticeable around the mouth, nose, and eyebrows.
  • Papules and pustules: Some people with facial TSW may develop small, raised bumps (papules) or pus-filled lesions (pustules) on the skin. These can be mistaken for acne breakouts but are actually a sign of skin inflammation.
  • Skin sensitivity: The face may become incredibly sensitive to touch, temperature changes, and even gentle skincare products in TSW. Many people report a feeling of tightness, tenderness, or rawness on the skin.

Two specific facial manifestations of TSW that are worth noting are perioral dermatitis and steroid rosacea.

Perioral dermatitis is a rash that develops around the mouth, often with small red bumps, pustules, and flaking skin[2]. It can be triggered by the use of topical steroids on the face, especially around the mouth and nose. When topical steroids are stopped, the rash may initially worsen before gradually improving over several weeks to months.

Steroid rosacea, on the other hand, refers to a worsening of pre-existing rosacea or the development of rosacea-like symptoms after prolonged topical steroid use on the face[3]. Symptoms may include persistent redness, flushing, visible blood vessels, and acne-like bumps on the cheeks, nose, and forehead. Steroid rosacea can be particularly challenging to treat, as traditional rosacea therapies may be too harsh for the compromised skin barrier in TSW.

Another facial area that can be affected by TSW is the eyelids. Eyelid dermatitis, or inflammation of the delicate skin around the eyes, is a common reason for topical steroid use on the face. However, the thin, sensitive skin of the eyelids is particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of steroids, including skin thinning, pigment changes, and TSW[4].

Symptoms of eyelid TSW may include:

  • Redness and swelling of the eyelids
  • Itching and burning sensations
  • Dryness and flaking of the eyelid skin
  • Sensitivity to light and eye irritation
  • Blurred vision or eye pain in severe cases

Managing facial TSW requires a gentle, patient approach to skincare and a close partnership with a dermatologist experienced in treating this condition. Some key strategies include:

  • Moisturization: Using a fragrance-free, hypoallergenic moisturizer or emollient can help soothe and protect the skin barrier during TSW. Look for products with ingredients like ceramides, hyaluronic acid, or colloidal oatmeal.
  • Gentle cleansing: Wash the face with lukewarm water and a mild, non-foaming cleanser to avoid stripping the skin of its natural oils. Pat the skin dry gently instead of rubbing.
  • Sun protection: Wear a broad-spectrum, mineral-based sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 to protect the vulnerable skin from UV damage. Look for products with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide as the active ingredients.
  • Cool compresses: Applying a cool, damp cloth to the face can help relieve itching, burning, and swelling. Be sure to use a clean cloth each time and avoid rubbing or scrubbing the skin.
  • Humidifier: Running a humidifier in your home or office can help add moisture to the air and prevent skin dryness and irritation.
  • Trigger avoidance: Identify and avoid personal triggers that worsen facial TSW, such as heat, sweat, stress, or certain skincare products. Keep a symptom diary to help track potential triggers.

It’s important to note that healing from facial TSW is a gradual process that can take several months to a year or more. During this time, it’s crucial to be patient with your skin and avoid the temptation to use topical steroids or harsh skincare products to control symptoms. Working closely with a dermatologist can help you navigate the challenges of facial TSW and develop a personalized treatment plan to support skin healing.

Hand TSW Symptoms

The hands are another common site for TSW, as they are frequently exposed to topical steroids for conditions like hand eczema, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis. The palms and fingers have a high density of sweat glands and are constantly in contact with environmental irritants, making them particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of prolonged steroid use.

Common symptoms of hand TSW include:

  • Redness and inflammation: The hands may appear red, swollen, and inflamed during TSW, especially on the palms, fingers, and between the fingers. This redness may be persistent or come and go in flares.
  • Itching and burning: Intense itching is a hallmark symptom of hand TSW, often described as a deep, unrelenting itch that is difficult to control. The hands may also feel hot, burning, or stinging, especially when exposed to water, sweat, or irritants.
  • Dryness and flaking: As the skin barrier is disrupted in TSW, the hands may become extremely dry, tight, and prone to flaking or peeling. The skin may appear rough, scaly, or cracked, especially on the knuckles, fingertips, and palms.
  • Oozing and crusting: In severe cases of hand TSW, the skin may develop open sores or cracks that ooze clear fluid or pus. As this ooze dries, it can form yellow or brown crusts on the skin, increasing the risk of infection.
  • Fissures and cracks: Deep, painful cracks or fissures may develop on the hands, especially on the palms, fingers, and in the skin folds. These cracks can make it difficult to perform daily activities like writing, typing, or gripping objects.
  • Swelling and edema: TSW can cause the hands to appear swollen or puffy, particularly on the backs of the hands and fingers. This swelling, known as edema, is due to increased inflammation and fluid retention in the skin.
  • Nail changes: In some cases, hand TSW can affect the nails, causing them to become thick, brittle, or discolored. The skin around the nails (cuticles) may also become red, swollen, or painful.

Two specific manifestations of hand TSW that are worth noting are steroid-induced hand dermatitis and red, cracked hands.

Steroid-induced hand dermatitis refers to a worsening of pre-existing hand eczema or the development of new eczema-like symptoms after prolonged topical steroid use on the hands[5]. Symptoms may include intense redness, itching, scaling, and oozing on the palms, fingers, and between the fingers. This type of hand dermatitis can be particularly challenging to treat, as the hands are constantly exposed to irritants and moisture.

Red, cracked hands are another common presentation of hand TSW, characterized by bright red, inflamed skin on the palms and fingers that is prone to painful cracking and fissuring[6]. The cracks may bleed or ooze, increasing the risk of infection and making it difficult to use the hands for daily activities. This type of TSW can be incredibly distressing and may require intensive moisturization and protection to promote healing.

Managing hand TSW requires a combination of gentle skincare, protective measures, and close collaboration with a dermatologist. Some key strategies include:

  • Moisturization: Using a thick, fragrance-free hand cream or ointment can help soothe and protect the skin barrier during TSW. Look for products with ingredients like ceramides, shea butter, or petrolatum, and apply them liberally and frequently, especially after washing the hands.
  • Gentle cleansing: Wash the hands with lukewarm water and a mild, fragrance-free soap or cleanser. Avoid hot water and harsh, antibacterial soaps that can further dry and irritate the skin. Pat the hands dry gently instead of rubbing.
  • Protective gloves: Wearing cotton-lined rubber or vinyl gloves can help protect the hands from irritants and moisture during daily activities like washing dishes, cleaning, or gardening. Choose gloves that fit well and avoid those with latex, as this can cause allergic reactions.
  • Overnight treatments: Applying a thick layer of moisturizer or a prescribed ointment to the hands and covering them with cotton gloves overnight can help deeply hydrate and heal the skin.
  • Cool compresses: Applying a cool, damp cloth to the hands can help relieve itching, burning, and swelling. Be sure to use a clean cloth each time and avoid rubbing or scrubbing the skin.
  • Trigger avoidance: Identify and avoid personal triggers that worsen hand TSW, such as certain soaps, detergents, or chemicals. Use mild, fragrance-free products whenever possible and rinse the hands thoroughly after exposure to irritants.

It’s important to be patient and consistent with hand TSW treatment, as healing can take several weeks to several months. Avoid the temptation to use topical steroids to control symptoms, as this can perpetuate the cycle of addiction and withdrawal. If you’re struggling to manage your symptoms or experiencing frequent infections, don’t hesitate to reach out to your dermatologist for guidance and support.

Lip TSW Symptoms

The lips are another area that can be affected by TSW, although this is less common than facial or hand involvement. Topical steroids are sometimes used on the lips to treat conditions like eczema, psoriasis, or cheilitis (inflammation of the lips). However, the delicate, thin skin of the lips is particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of steroids, including skin thinning, pigment changes, and TSW.

Symptoms of lip TSW may include:

  • Redness and swelling: The lips may appear red, swollen, and inflamed during TSW, especially along the vermilion border (the line where the lips meet the skin). This redness may be persistent or come and go in flares.
  • Dryness and flaking: As the skin barrier is disrupted in TSW, the lips may become extremely dry, tight, and prone to flaking or peeling. The skin may appear rough, scaly, or cracked, especially in the corners of the mouth.
  • Burning and stinging: Many people with lip TSW report a burning or stinging sensation, especially when the lips are exposed to heat, cold, or certain foods or beverages. This can be incredibly uncomfortable and may interfere with eating and drinking.
  • Itching: Intense itching is another common symptom of lip TSW, often described as a deep, unrelenting itch that is difficult to control. Scratching or picking at the lips can lead to further skin damage and increase the risk of infection.
  • Cracks and fissures: Deep, painful cracks or fissures may develop on the lips, especially in the corners of the mouth. These cracks can bleed or ooze, making it painful to open the mouth or eat.
  • Crusting: In severe cases of lip TSW, the skin may develop crusts or scabs, especially if there is oozing or bleeding present. These crusts can be yellow or brown in color and may be tender to the touch.

One specific manifestation of lip TSW that is worth noting is steroid-induced cheilitis. This refers to a worsening of pre-existing cheilitis or the development of new cheilitis-like symptoms after prolonged topical steroid use on the lips[7]. Symptoms may include intense redness, scaling, cracking, and oozing on the lips and in the corners of the mouth. Steroid-induced cheilitis can be particularly challenging to treat, as the lips are constantly exposed to saliva, food, and environmental irritants.

Managing lip TSW requires a gentle, patient approach to skincare and a close partnership with a dermatologist experienced in treating this condition. Some key strategies include:

  • Moisturization: Using a fragrance-free, hypoallergenic lip balm or ointment can help soothe and protect the delicate skin of the lips during TSW. Look for products with ingredients like petrolatum, beeswax, or shea butter, and apply them liberally and frequently, especially before eating or drinking.
  • Gentle cleansing: Avoid using harsh soaps or cleansers on the lips, as these can further dry and irritate the skin. Instead, gently wipe the lips with a soft, damp cloth to remove any crusts or flakes.
  • Cool compresses: Applying a cool, damp cloth to the lips can help relieve itching, burning, and swelling. Be sure to use a clean cloth each time and avoid rubbing or scrubbing the skin.
  • Trigger avoidance: Identify and avoid personal triggers that worsen lip TSW, such as certain foods, beverages, or environmental factors like wind or cold air. Use a humidifier in your home or office to add moisture to the air and prevent lip dryness.
  • Alternative treatments: In some cases, your dermatologist may recommend alternative treatments for lip TSW, such as topical calcineurin inhibitors (like tacrolimus or pimecrolimus) or low-level light therapy[8]. These treatments can help reduce inflammation and promote healing without the risk of steroid addiction.

It’s important to be patient and consistent with lip TSW treatment, as healing can take several weeks to several months. Avoid the temptation to use topical steroids or harsh lip products to control symptoms, as this can perpetuate the cycle of addiction and withdrawal. If you’re experiencing severe pain, difficulty eating or drinking, or signs of infection, don’t hesitate to reach out to your dermatologist for guidance and support.

Stages of TSW

TSW is a complex and individualized process that can vary greatly from person to person. However, many people with TSW experience a similar pattern of symptoms and stages of healing. Understanding these stages can help you anticipate what to expect and develop a plan for managing your symptoms.

The stages of TSW are often described as follows[9]:

  1. Pre-withdrawal: This is the stage before TSW begins, when the person is still using topical steroids regularly. They may notice that their skin is becoming less responsive to the medication over time, requiring higher doses or more frequent application to achieve the same results.
  2. Acute withdrawal: This stage begins when the person stops using topical steroids abruptly or starts to taper their dose. Symptoms typically develop within a few days to a few weeks and can be severe and distressing. Common symptoms include intense redness, burning, stinging, itching, oozing, and flaking of the skin. Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills, and fatigue, may also occur.
  3. Healing and recovery: As the skin begins to heal and adjust to life without topical steroids, the acute symptoms of TSW will start to subside. This stage can last for several months to a year or more, depending on the individual case. During this time, the skin may go through cycles of improvement and flare-ups, gradually becoming less inflamed and more resilient over time.
  4. Post-withdrawal: This is the stage when the skin has fully healed and is no longer dependent on topical steroids. The person may still experience occasional eczema flare-ups or sensitivity, but these can typically be managed with gentle skincare and trigger avoidance. Some people may have lingering pigment changes, skin atrophy, or telangiectasia (visible blood vessels) as a result of long-term steroid use.

It’s important to note that these stages are not always linear and can overlap or recur over time. Some people may experience a more rapid or severe withdrawal process, while others may have a more gradual and mild course. Working closely with a dermatologist can help you navigate the stages of TSW and develop a personalized plan for managing your symptoms and promoting healing.

Treatment Options for TSW

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating TSW, there are several strategies that can help manage symptoms, support skin healing, and improve quality of life. The main goals of treatment are to control inflammation, relieve discomfort, prevent complications, and promote the skin’s natural barrier function.

Some common treatment options for TSW include:

  1. Moisturization: Using a gentle, fragrance-free moisturizer or emollient is one of the most important steps in managing TSW. Moisturizers help soothe and protect the skin, reduce water loss, and improve the skin’s barrier function. Look for products with ingredients like ceramides, hyaluronic acid, or colloidal oatmeal, and apply them liberally and frequently, especially after bathing or showering.
  2. Wet wraps: Applying topical medications or moisturizers under a layer of damp gauze or clothing, known as wet wrapping, can help enhance their absorption and provide a physical barrier against scratching. Wet wraps can be especially helpful for managing severe or widespread TSW symptoms.
  3. Topical medications: While topical steroids should be avoided during TSW, other topical medications may be used to help control inflammation and relieve symptoms. These may include topical calcineurin inhibitors (like tacrolimus or pimecrolimus), topical vitamin D analogs, or topical antibiotics if secondary infections develop.
  4. Oral medications: In some cases, oral medications may be prescribed to help manage TSW symptoms or treat complications. These may include oral antihistamines for itching, oral antibiotics for infections, or immunosuppressants like cyclosporine for severe, refractory cases.
  5. Phototherapy: Controlled exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, known as phototherapy, can help reduce inflammation and promote skin healing in some cases of TSW. Narrow-band UVB and UVA1 are the most common types of phototherapy used for TSW, typically administered in a dermatologist’s office or phototherapy center.
  6. Stress management: Stress is a common trigger for TSW flare-ups and can exacerbate symptoms. Engaging in stress-reducing activities like deep breathing, meditation, yoga, or exercise can help promote relaxation and reduce inflammation.
  7. Dietary modifications: Some people with TSW find that certain foods or supplements can help support skin healing and reduce inflammation. These may include omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, vitamin D, or anti-inflammatory herbs like turmeric. However, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider before making significant changes to your diet.
  8. Alternative therapies: Some people with TSW may benefit from alternative therapies like acupuncture, massage, or mind-body practices like hypnosis or biofeedback. While more research is needed to confirm their effectiveness, these therapies may help reduce stress, relieve pain, and promote overall well-being.

It’s important to work closely with a dermatologist to develop a personalized treatment plan for TSW, as individual needs and responses can vary widely. Your dermatologist can help you weigh the potential risks and benefits of different treatment options and monitor your progress over time.

In addition to medical treatments, there are several lifestyle modifications and self-care practices that can help support skin healing and improve quality of life during TSW. These may include:

  • Gentle skincare: Using mild, fragrance-free cleansers and moisturizers, avoiding hot showers or baths, and patting the skin dry instead of rubbing.
  • Cool compresses: Applying a cool, damp cloth to the affected areas can help relieve itching, burning, and swelling.
  • Loose, breathable clothing: Wearing soft, breathable fabrics like cotton or bamboo can help reduce friction and irritation on the skin.
  • Humidifier: Running a humidifier in your home or office can help add moisture to the air and prevent skin dryness.
  • Trigger avoidance: Identifying and avoiding personal triggers that worsen TSW symptoms, such as certain foods, environmental factors, or stress.
  • Support groups: Joining a TSW support group, either in person or online, can provide emotional support, practical advice, and a sense of community during the healing process.

Remember, healing from TSW is a gradual and individualized process that requires patience, persistence, and self-compassion. It’s important to be kind to yourself and celebrate the small victories along the way, even on difficult days. With time, proper treatment, and support, it is possible to heal from TSW and regain your quality of life.

Emotional Impact of TSW

TSW can be an incredibly challenging and isolating experience, not just physically but also emotionally. The visible skin changes, constant discomfort, and impact on daily life can take a significant toll on mental health and well-being.

Some common emotional challenges of TSW include:

  • Anxiety and depression: The unpredictable nature of TSW symptoms, the length of the healing process, and the impact on work, relationships, and social activities can contribute to feelings of anxiety and depression. Many people with TSW report feeling overwhelmed, hopeless, or helpless at times.
  • Social isolation: The visible skin changes and discomfort of TSW can make it difficult to engage in social activities or maintain relationships. Some people may feel self-conscious or embarrassed about their appearance, leading to social withdrawal and isolation.
  • Sleep disturbances: The intense itching, burning, and discomfort of TSW can make it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, leading to fatigue, irritability, and difficulty concentrating during the day.
  • Body image concerns: The changes in skin appearance and texture during TSW can impact self-esteem and body image. Some people may feel unattractive, ashamed, or disconnected from their bodies.
  • Grief and loss: TSW can disrupt many aspects of daily life, including work, hobbies, and relationships. Some people may experience a sense of grief or loss for the life they had before TSW, or for the time and experiences they feel they have missed out on.

It’s important to remember that these emotional challenges are a normal and understandable response to the stress and uncertainty of TSW. It’s okay to not be okay sometimes, and to need extra support and care during this time.

Some strategies that may help cope with the emotional impact of TSW include:

  • Seeking professional support: Working with a therapist or counselor who has experience with chronic illness or skin conditions can provide a safe space to process emotions, develop coping strategies, and build resilience.
  • Connecting with others: Joining a TSW support group, either in person or online, can provide a sense of community and understanding. Talking with others who have gone through similar experiences can help reduce feelings of isolation and provide practical advice and encouragement.
  • Practicing self-care: Engaging in activities that promote relaxation, stress relief, and self-nurturing can help improve mood and overall well-being. This may include deep breathing, meditation, gentle exercise, hobbies, or spending time in nature.
  • Focusing on the present: TSW can be a long and unpredictable journey, and it’s easy to get caught up in worries about the future or regrets about the past. Practicing mindfulness and focusing on the present moment can help reduce anxiety and improve coping.
  • Celebrating small victories: Healing from TSW is a gradual process, and it’s important to acknowledge and celebrate the small steps forward, even on difficult days. Keeping a gratitude journal or sharing milestones with loved ones can help maintain a sense of progress and hope.
  • Advocating for yourself: Learning about TSW and communicating your needs and concerns with healthcare providers, loved ones, and employers can help you feel more in control and empowered. Don’t be afraid to ask for accommodations or support when needed.

Remember, healing from TSW is not just about physical recovery, but also about emotional and mental well-being. It’s important to be patient and compassionate with yourself, and to reach out for help when needed. With time, support, and self-care, it is possible to navigate the challenges of TSW and emerge with greater resilience and self-awareness.

Conclusion

TSW is a complex and challenging condition that can have a significant impact on physical, emotional, and social well-being. The face, hands, and lips are particularly vulnerable to the effects of prolonged topical steroid use and can develop a range of symptoms during the withdrawal process.

While the journey of TSW can be difficult and unpredictable, it’s important to remember that healing is possible with time, patience, and proper care. Working closely with a knowledgeable and compassionate dermatologist, using gentle skincare practices, and developing a personalized treatment plan can help manage symptoms and support skin recovery.

In addition to medical treatment, seeking support from loved ones, mental health professionals, and the TSW community can be invaluable for coping with the emotional challenges of the condition. Practicing self-care, focusing on the present, and celebrating small victories can help maintain a sense of hope and resilience.

If you or a loved one is struggling with TSW, know that you are not alone and that there are resources and support available. Don’t hesitate to reach out for help and advocate for your needs. With time and care, it is possible to heal from TSW and reclaim your quality of life.

Key Takeaways

  • TSW can cause a range of symptoms on the face, including redness, burning, stinging, itching, and dryness. Perioral dermatitis, steroid rosacea, and eyelid dermatitis are common manifestations of facial TSW.
  • TSW on the hands can cause redness, itching, dryness, cracking, and oozing. Steroid-induced hand dermatitis and red, cracked hands are common presentations of hand TSW.
  • TSW on the lips can cause redness, dryness, cracking, and crusting. Steroid-induced cheilitis is a specific manifestation of lip TSW.
  • The stages of TSW include pre-withdrawal, acute withdrawal, healing and recovery, and post-withdrawal. These stages can vary in duration and severity from person to person.
  • Treatment options for TSW include moisturization, wet wraps, topical and oral medications, phototherapy, stress management, and dietary modifications. A personalized approach is important for managing symptoms and promoting healing.
  • The emotional impact of TSW can be significant, including anxiety, depression, social isolation, sleep disturbances, and body image concerns. Seeking support from professionals, loved ones, and the TSW community can be helpful for coping with these challenges.
  • Healing from TSW is a gradual and individualized process that requires patience, self-compassion, and a holistic approach to care. With time and proper treatment, it is possible to recover from TSW and improve quality of life.

FAQs

How long does TSW last on the face and hands?

The duration of TSW can vary widely from person to person, depending on factors like the potency and duration of topical steroid use, individual skin characteristics, and overall health. On average, the healing process can take anywhere from several months to a year or more. Some people may experience lingering symptoms or sensitivity even after the skin has largely healed.

Can I use makeup during facial TSW?

It’s generally best to avoid using makeup during the acute stages of facial TSW, as it can further irritate the skin and interfere with the healing process. If you do choose to wear makeup, look for products that are fragrance-free, non-comedogenic, and gentle on the skin. Always remove makeup gently and thoroughly at the end of the day, and prioritize skincare and moisturization.

How can I prevent infections during hand TSW?

To reduce the risk of infections during hand TSW, it’s important to keep the skin clean and moisturized, and to avoid picking or scratching at any open wounds or cracks. Applying a fragrance-free, hypoallergenic hand cream or ointment can help protect the skin and promote healing. If you notice any signs of infection, such as increased redness, swelling, pain, or discharge, contact your dermatologist promptly for evaluation and treatment.

Can diet affect TSW on the lips?

While there is no specific diet that has been proven to cure or prevent TSW on the lips, some people find that certain foods or drinks can aggravate their symptoms. Common triggers include spicy, acidic, or salty foods, as well as hot or cold beverages. Keeping a food diary and avoiding any identified triggers may be helpful for managing lip TSW symptoms.

Will my skin ever be the same after TSW?

While the healing process from TSW can be lengthy and challenging, most people do experience significant improvement in their skin over time. Some may have lingering changes in skin texture, color, or sensitivity, but these changes are often manageable with proper skincare and lifestyle habits. Working closely with a dermatologist can help ensure the best possible outcome and long-term skin health after TSW.

References

  1. Hajar, T., Leshem, Y. A., Hanifin, J. M., Nedorost, S. T., Lio, P. A., Paller, A. S., Block, J., & Simpson, E. L. (2015). A systematic review of topical corticosteroid withdrawal (“steroid addiction”) in patients with atopic dermatitis and other dermatoses. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 72(3), 541-549.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2014.11.024
  2. Nguyen, T., & Zuniga, R. (2013). Skin conditions: perioral dermatitis. FP Essentials, 407, 17-20. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23600332/
  3. Litt, J. Z. (1974). Steroid-induced rosacea. American Journal of Ophthalmology, 78(3), 515-517. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9394(74)90925-990925-9)
  4. Rapaport, M. J., & Rapaport, V. (1999). Eyelid dermatitis to red face syndrome to cure: clinical experience in 100 cases. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 41(3 Pt 1), 435-442. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0190-9622(99)70117-x70117-x)
  5. Sheary, B. (2018). Topical steroid addiction and withdrawal – An overview for GPs. Australian Family Physician, 47(5), 329-333. https://www.racgp.org.au/afp/2018/may/topical-steroid-addiction-and-withdrawal
  6. Juhász, M. L. W., Curley, R. A., Rasmussen, A., Malakouti, M., Silverberg, N., & Jacob, S. E. (2017). Systematic Review of the Topical Steroid Addiction and Topical Steroid Withdrawal Phenomenon in Children Diagnosed With Atopic Dermatitis and Treated With Topical Corticosteroids. Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association, 9(5), 233-240. https://doi.org/10.1097/JDN.0000000000000331
  7. Hamada, M., Kirby, J., & Al-Zaid, T. (2005). Perioral dermatitis and cheilitis caused by contact allergy to sodium lauryl sulfate. Contact Dermatitis, 52(1), 55. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0105-1873.2005.0487e.x
  8. Wollina, U. (2011). Topical calcineurin inhibitors for facial seborrhoeic dermatitis. The British Journal of Dermatology, 165(1), 178-179. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10320.x
  9. Fukaya, M., Sato, K., Sato, M., Kimata, H., Fujisawa, S., Dozono, H., Yoshizawa, J., & Minaguchi, S. (2014). Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis. Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, 6, 131-138. https://doi.org/10.2147/DHPS.S69201
Rate this post


Image
Image

MIRARI®
Cold Plasma System

The world's first handheld cold plasma device

Learn More


Made in USA

Image